Change Board Recertification

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Dear Colleagues:

Organized opposition to MOC is gaining momentum.

Since the June 2010 launch of Change Board Recertification (http://www.changeboardrecert.com) we have had overwhelming support and consensus from our colleagues.

We have updated our website with many articles and letters, new physician commentary and revealing financial information about our nonprofit Boards, all showing how MOC has evolved into a discriminatory and costly burden to physicians, patients and healthcare. The Boards’ MOC program has become a profiteering juggernaut without any reasonable proof of benefit, efficacy or patient protection, and compliance is slowly being tied to the privilege of practicing medicine.

It’s time for us to stop blindly accepting mandates and doing what we’re told to do, and instead oppose the multimillion-dollar “Board Certification Industry” prerogative of the ABMS and FSMB. We must actively unite and oppose Hospital, Insurance and State Board attempts to impose MOC and MOL requirements to practice medicine, and stop the ongoing and widespread extortion by programs lacking any evidenced-based data to validate that certification actually benefits patient care or physician competency. We must become vocal at every attempt and every level of attack.

Please take the time to review the entire website, then “Join the Discussion” and forward this website to all your colleagues.

Sincerely,

Ron Benbassat, M.D.
Founder, ChangeBoardReCert.com

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  • Samuel Deutsch, MD, MPH

    Regarding MOC,
    Recently applied for a job with Emory Healthcare: Atlanta, Ga. I was told that I am “not a good fit” for their Geriatric Department because I “let my board certification lapse”. According to NBPAS, Emory Healthcare is one of 61 hospitals accepting NBPAS diplomats, as of 06/29/2017. My record in private practice has been “spic and span” clean for 35 years of private practice. I recently retired from private practice last January 2017. I am Board Certified by ABIM in IM 1981, Geriatrics 1992 (ABIM), Geriatrics 2004 (ABIM), Geriatrics 2015 (NBPAS), Internal Medicine 2017 (NBPAS), and Geriatrics 2017 (NBPAS). The head of the Geriatric Department discounted my NBPAS certifications. Perhaps, they did not want a healthy and young 67 year old physician working in their geriatric department?

    Samuel Deutsch, MD, MPH

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