COVID-19: What about Testing?

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You may be asking yourself, will this ever end?

The graph shows the rising incidence of COVID in both vaccinated and unvaccinated in Iceland. The Omicron variant is on the march. Everyone may eventually get it, perhaps without any symptoms.

A few weeks ago, home test kits for COVID were easily obtained at your local pharmacy, but they sold out. The federal government is coming to the rescue. How reliable are the tests? We do not know. ALL diagnostic tests have false negatives and false positives. If you test mostly healthy people, a large percentage of the positive tests will be false positives.

It’s winter—also cold and influenza season. For many people COVID is like a cold, and about a third of colds are caused by a type of coronavirus. So, should you get tested every time you get the sniffles or are in contact with someone who has symptoms?

Every doctor has had patients worried that a cold may “go into pneumonia”—and it might. But doctors are taught to tell them that the antibiotics they are demanding won’t help. This might be incorrect, as some studies have shown. The routine denial of early treatment for COVID, except for selective use of monoclonal antibodies, may however come to an end with the emergency use authorization of new drugs by Pfizer and Merck (Paxlovid and molnupiravir).

These are expensive (the government has paid more than $700 for a course of treatment with molnupiravir), potentially may have serious adverse effects, and are at present mostly unavailable.

So, what should you do, whether a test is positive, negative, or unknown? Wash your hands of course. (Ignaz Semmelweis was right about that although the medical establishment had him put in an insane establishment for suggesting it.) But what about your nose, where the virus is proliferating?

One physician recommends inhaling warm moist air as from a fabric steamer. Others suggest using dilute povidone iodine (Betadine) or hydrogen peroxide. To protect your immune system, adequate vitamin D3, zinc, and quercetin or other zinc ionophore are needed. Many affordable, long-approved drugs have been shown to be of benefit, especially if used early. Some require a prescription.

People are urged to get vaccinated and boosted, even with mix-and-match products. Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla admitted that their product had limited if any efficacy against Omicron (the video may have been removed), but they are working on a new version. In any event, if you are infected it is too late to get vaxxed, at least for a while.

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