COVID-19: Blacks Hit Harder—Is It Racism?

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 I’m sure you would not approve of denying effective treatment to black patients. COVID-19 is hitting black patients hardest. What can be done?

A black doctor, an immigrant from Cameroon, is treating COVID-19 patients in Houston—many or most of them probably black, and she states that all 350 (and counting) are getting well and none have died. You’d think that would be at the top of the news. But the video of her talk and others in the press conference held by America’s Frontline Doctors was promptly taken down by YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter.  The web host, SquareSpace, also deleted their website.

Dr. Stella Immanuel prescribes hydroxychloroquine, and she dared to use the word “cured.”

The video is preserved by Bitchute. Millions of viewers saw the talks by real physicians, including Dr. Simone Gold and Dr. Immanuel, before the censors acted. Even tweets by the  President of the United States and Donald Trump, Jr., were deleted.

Dr. Immanuel got mentioned in The Hill, with derogatory comments about her religious beliefs—she is also a Christian pastor. Bigoted, culturally insensitive, xenophobic perhaps? The trigger for hit pieces, however, is that she is treating COVID-19 patients and making them well, instead of telling them to go home, isolate, and go to the hospital when they can’t breathe. She treats old people, diabetics, asthma patients, and hypertensives. They get better.

A few powerful people in the FDA, CDC, NIH, WHO, and state governments—with ties to manufacturers of remdesivir and vaccines—are making it extremely difficult for patients to get a cheap, long-established medication. And Big Tech doesn’t even want patients to hear about it.

Highly credentialed physicians say they stand for science and randomized controlled trials—and that HCQ should not be used. Dr. Immanuel holds certain beliefs that some find deplorable. Leaving aside political beliefs and personal attacks on scientists who published favorable studies, the question is: Which patients are dying? Those denied, or those receiving early treatment  with HCQ?

AAPS has filed a lawsuit in an attempt to compel the FDA to stop obstructing the use of this long-approved drug, safely used for 65 years by hundreds of millions of patients. Let physicians treat their patients! FDA delays may have cost 16,000 patients their lives this month.

For information on studies of hydroxychloroquine, see c19study.com.