COVID-19: If I’m Pregnant, or Hope to Be, Should I Still Get the Jab?

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If you or someone you love is hoping to have a baby, special caution is needed about any type of medical treatment.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is not giving clear advice. CDC head Rochelle Walensky said at a White House briefing that the “CDC recommends that pregnant people receive the COVID-19 vaccine,” citing a study in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). A few days later a CDC spokesperson said the CDC’s guidance for pregnant people had not changed from its March recommendation, which is that “pregnant people are eligible and can receive a COVID-19 vaccine.”

Authors of the NEJM study stated: “Preliminary findings did not show obvious safety signals among pregnant persons who received mRNA Covid-19 vaccines.” In a letter to the editor-in-chief, Hooman Noorchashm, M.D., Ph.D., writes that while 35,691 is a large number of patients, “safety for a majority does NOT guarantee safety in minority subsets of persons at risk and it certainly CANNOT obviate duty to identifiable minority subsets of persons, who are or may be at risk of serious injury or death.”

Dr. Noorchashm is primarily concerned about persons who have recently had COVID-19 or might currently have an asymptomatic infection.

        The question is especially urgent as some 200 colleges and universities are demanding that students, including women in their prime child-bearing years, be vaccinated before they are allowed to set foot on campus.

        Dozens of miscarriages after a COVID vaccination have been reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), which captures only a small fraction of events. It has not been shown that the vaccination caused the miscarriage.

        In addition, there are thousands of reports of menstrual irregularities.

        Many tissues of the body have receptors for the “spike” on SARS-CoV2 virus. Studies of placentas from mothers who gave birth after having COVID show that spike protein is localized in the placental villi, the interface between mother and fetus. Will the spike protein that the body manufactures after receiving the Pfizer, Moderna, or J&J product attach to the placenta and provoke an auto-immune reaction, jeopardizing present and future pregnancies? We do not know.

        Results of animal reproductive toxicity studies have not been reported, and it is far too early to see long-term effects on human fertility, either male or female.

For further information:

Weekly summaries of reports to British Yellow Card system (scroll down to “vaccine analysis profile”)