COVID-19: No Right to Try Treatment?

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If you take a loved one to a hospital for COVID, should you say a final good-by?

The majority of people do get discharged, perhaps after weeks of isolation, often with chronic organ damage. But we are hearing heart-breaking stories from around the U.S. about patients who were denied early treatment, eventually admitted, and died, while patients who received early treatment recovered at home.

At a Nov 19 Senate hearing, three physicians testified about the urgent need for early treatment, and the excellent results they have seen in thousands of patients.

One academic physician, who has never treated a patient for COVID, defended the denial of treatment, insisting there was not sufficient evidence for effectiveness. He thinks that to “do no harm” means to withhold treatment—of a potentially lethal disease—because of the risk of side effects.

Dr. Peter McCullough, a cardiologist at Baylor; Dr. George Fareed, a family medicine specialist; and Dr. Harvey Risch, an epidemiologist at Yale, testified that:

  • Thousands of Americans will die needlessly in the coming months without early, at-home treatment, regardless of public health restrictions and possible vaccines.
  • As many as 100,000 of those already dead might have been saved.
  • Treatment protocols being used by thousands of physicians, including hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), ivermectin, and judicious steroids and anticoagulants, are extremely safe.
  • Better trials of the randomized controlled type advocated by the negative witness, Dr. Ashish Jha, should be done, but the NIH has not funded them, and ongoing trials have lacked volunteers because of scary misinformation about HCQ.
  • There is overwhelming evidence of benefit from HCQ. The chance that an ineffective treatment could have produced results as positive as the 145 studies of HCQ reported to date is about 1 in 235 billion (see graphic below).

What you can do now to inform yourself and save lines:

Ask your doctor whether he will treat you if you get COVID. Resources, including treatment protocols and physicians and facilities offering early treatment: https://c19protocols.com/

Reported studies of HCQ in COVID-19 Showing Degree of Decreased or Increased Risk