COVID-19: What about the Delta Variant?

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With the Delta variant causing about half of new infections, should you do anything differently?

Should you rush to get vaccinated if you haven’t already? Or feel secure if you are vaccinated? Research “suggests that most vaccines still provide good protection against it—and remain highly effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths.”

Vaccinated people probably have antibodies that work against variants, but are we seeing antibody-dependent enhancement of disease, as occurred in animals vaccinated against SARS-CoV-1 a decade ago? Because of this, the vaccine was not used in humans.

This table shows that vaccinated people with Delta variant disease were six times more likely to die than unvaccinated people, according to figures from Public Health England.

https://twitter.com/robinmonotti2/status/1405868364963139588

The bar graph shows the number of deaths in red and cases in black, by vaccination status. Here, the death rate is 8.5 times higher in those with two doses of vaccine than in those who have received none.

https://twitter.com/RealJoelSmalley/status/1411080854634479616?s=20

The Delta strain appears to have originated in India. In Delhi, the strategy is to treat with ivermectin; in London, to vaccinate. The graph below compares the results. Between June 1 and June 14, per capita cases in Delhi decreased 77%, and in London increased 206%.

https://twitter.com/jjchamie/status/1406311803810889730

Viruses mutate. It is their nature. Do vaccines select out mutants, as antibiotics do? Possibly. The COVID jabs, unlike traditional vaccines, induce a very narrow range of immunity, to the spike protein that the vaccinee’s body makes. Drugs such as ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine do not depend on such a specific viral protein.

There are many things to consider in making your personal risk: benefit assessment, and many unknowns.

For further information:

Jane Orient, M.D., Exec. Dir., Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, [email protected]