COVID Vaccine Mandate Will Not Protect Military Readiness

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While Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin has stated that mandatory COVID-19 vaccination is needed to protect the health and readiness of the armed forces, Steven J. Hatfill, M.D., writing in the summer issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons, states that this policy has the potential to generate both short and long-term incapacitating side effects in our Special Operations soldiers.

Current mRNA products create only a short-term immunity to the original viral strains, he writes, and cannot reliably prevent infection with the now dominant strains. He refers to an Israeli study of 2.5 million patients, which found that fully vaccinated individuals were 6 to 13 times more likely to get infected with some SARS-CoV-2 variants than individuals who developed a natural exposure from a previous COVID-19 infection.

Citing growing evidence of vaccine-associated miscarriages, serious cardiac and neurologic conditions, and possible antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection, Dr. Hatfill writes that the Food and Drug Administration, with its antiquated surveillance system, is “incapable of monitoring vaccine safety and efficacy.”

Clinical trials were rushed and incomplete, he states. “As early as February 2021, some scientists were calling for a halt to the mass vaccination program.”

Dr. Hatfill also maintains that “early COVID-19 infection is unequivocally a treatable condition” and that “safe antiviral drug prophylaxis is also available for units and dependents.”

“Military readiness,” he concludes, “should be protected with early detection and diagnosis, plus early treatment and prophylaxis with a combination of safe repurposed drugs and immunologic support, rather than mandated use of incompletely tested novel products with potential serious adverse effects.”

The Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons is published by the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS), a national organization representing physicians in all specialties since 1943.

Read Article: https://jpands.org/vol27no2/hatfill1.pdf