How many COVID deaths are preventable?

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I hope you stay well, but if COVID-19 strikes you or a loved one, I hope you can find a doctor willing and able to help you.

Yale epidemiologist Harvey Frisch told Laura Ingraham that the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) could save up to 100,000 lives. But you probably won’t be able to get it. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, with or  without a positive test, your doctor may tell you to stay home, isolate yourself, take Tylenol for symptoms, and go to the ER if you can’t breathe.

Once in the hospital, you might—or might not—get the $3,000 new drug remdesivir or qualify for a clinical trial. If you get HCQ it will likely be too late to help. Antiviral drugs need to be given early.

HCQ was FDA approved in 1955 and has been taken safely by hundreds of millions of people. High government officials who are determining federal policy insist in private that doctors have the legal authority to prescribe HCQ or other FDA-approved drugs for “off-label” uses. However, the FDA has refused to reverse statements that state and local authorities cite to threaten doctors or pharmacists who provide you with this cheap remedy.

AAPS has filed for an injunction to force the FDA to stop obstructing use of this drug, while it hoards and wastes the millions of doses that manufacturers donated to the Strategic National Stockpile.

If a drug could save 100,000 lives, then government agencies that block its use are responsible for 100,000 needless deaths.

In some countries in Central America, officials are going door to door to distribute HCQ. Poor countries that allow free use of HCQ have far lower death rates than rich countries that hinder it.

For a summary of the evidence on HCQ, see c19study.com.